The Oxford Canal so far

Some snapshots of our journey along the Oxford from Sutton Stop to Banbury.

This canal is probably the most well-travelled in the country; thousands of narrowboaters queue up at the Napton and Claydon locks in the summer months, raving about the glorious countryside. Now whisper it, but so far I’ve been a bit underwhelmed. It’s not really a patch on its northern cousins for history, or scenery, or pork pies, or good beer. But there was an excellent bendy bit, near Fenny Compton, where we saw the same radio mast at least a dozen times from different angles. And some good water buffalo, too. So I’m not complaining.

Tom, incidentally, thinks I’m wrong and that the gentler “English” beauty of the Oxford Canal is the perfect complement to the tougher beauty of the more craggy waterways we’ve been on. I’ll leave you to be the judge from our collection of pics.

The junction of the Coventry and the Oxford, in the rain

The junction of the Coventry and the Oxford, in the rain

Sutton Stop Lock. A heady few inches.

Sutton Stop Lock. A heady few inches.

Tom hard at work

Tom hard at work

Layers weather.

Layers weather.

Harvest time!

Harvest time!

Excellent bramble jelly

Excellent bramble jelly

Ridge and furrow fields still visible by Braunston village

Ridge and furrow fields still visible by Braunston village

Braunston Junction

Braunston Junction

Monitoring our speed. A heady 3 mph.

Monitoring our speed. A heady 3 mph.

What a great name for a boat!

What a great name for a boat!

The cutest water buffalo I ever did see

The cutest water buffalo I ever did see

Scenic scenery

Scenic scenery

If you look carefully you'll see a cow trying to climb a lift bridge in the background

If you look carefully you’ll see a cow trying to climb a lift bridge in the background

Fenny Compton tunnel was a bit of a bottleneck. So they chopped the top off it. Mavericks.

Fenny Compton tunnel was a bit of a bottleneck. So they chopped the top off it. Mavericks.

Donkey

Donkey

Ass

Ass

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Posted in Cruising log, Flora and fauna

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